Crocheted Skateboard

It’s been hectic with an increased performance schedule, the booklet, and this:

It’s all crochet and needle felt over a skateboard. 

The art show this is going into is tonight, the Blood, Sweat, & Boards Art Show presented by Underground Clothing & Skateboard Company.  I’m also performing, so it’s going to be a big night.  There are first (limited edition production run of the artist’s deck), second ($1000 gift certificate to Stranded Tattoo parlor…  I WANT TO WIN SECOND PLACE), and third ($150 in art supplies from Utrecht) prizes, so I’m pretty excited to see how it turns out.  But for now, I’m going to get back to my booklet knitting.

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What I’ve learned on Ravelry

Raveler since October 15, 2007

Yup, that’s me.  I was just sitting here thinking about the past few years I’ve spent as a member of Ravelry.  I’ve learned a few things that I would like to share with you:

  • Every time the word “copyright” is written in the Big 6, someone has an aneurysm.
  • Patterns with lengthy, extraneous titles don’t usually live up to them.  Throw together a garter stitch scarf in Red Heart Super Saver and then get fairy-fucking-tastic with the name of the pattern.  Start with something like “Lady of the” and add an adjective like “enchanted” or “mystic”, followed by a location such as “forest”, “sea”, “wood”, or “truck stop shit house”.  Get creative with it.  Then add a $7 price tag.  Pat yourself on the back because you’re a professional now!
  • Disagree (1)?  DEAL WITH IT.
  • There are about ten times more knitted/crocheted penises than vagina.
  • Knitted/crocheted bathing suits = instant camel toe.
  • Does anyone buy any of those dishcloth patterns?!?!???
  • Now, I really want to design something that I can name “Lady of the Enchanted Truck Stop Shit House”.
  • Disagree (176)?  You’re probably an asshole.

A little ditty on criticism

Indie designers, who are typically very casual and accessible, get a great deal of critiquing.  I wouldn’t go on to say that indie designers receive more criticism than your headlining, Vogue Knitting contributors, but they certainly receive a fair amount.  Criticism is inevitable, both good and bad, when you produce something made available to the general public.  These critiques reach far and wide with the enormous following on Ravelry.com as well as personal blogs.  So, how do designers handle dialogues amongst knitters and crocheters?  What’s the appropriate avenue to take with the positive and negative feedback on their work?

Let’s use the Ravelry.com forums for an example.  When a person or group praises your pattern work in a forum thread, would you enter the conversation to thank them for their support and kind words?  It’s a matter of opinion.  Personally, I do.  Establishing a presence is important to me for creating positive relationships with pattern patrons and letting them know that I am readily available. 

But what about the negative feedback?  Let’s use the same scenario as before, but now the person or group is negatively criticising your pattern work.  It appears that when there is negative critiquing involved, it is either ignored by the designer or perhaps handled through private messages.  Why is it different here?  What do you think makes it taboo for a designer to step up publicly and refute or remedy the situation? 

You can’t please everyone, that is true.  I believe in the 10% Rule, which means that 90% of a designer’s clients are generally good, well-mannered people with tact.  The other 10% are not as level-headed, emotional, and in some rare instances, combative.  Do you engage them?  I guess it depends on whether or not they engage you.  My take on it is that if they rage publicly without directly communicating with you, take it in stride.  Read their thoughts, determine whether or not it is a warranted criticism, and leave it be.  However, if they communicate with the designer about the grievance they have with the pattern and begin a public dialogue, it becomes a sticky situation.  Do you ignore it or call them on it?  The designer should put forth their best effort to help the person through the problem, privately or publicly – it’s their call.  If the negative review remains, at least you would know that you had done your best to make thing right. 

What’s your take on knitting and crochet designer criticism?

Contest Giveaway!

I haven’t hosted a contest in a while, so let’s have a little fun.  In honor of publishing my newest pattern today, the Celeste capelet, any purchase of any of my patterns (through Ravelry) will put you in the drawing for a free pattern of your choice.  The contest begins today and runs until February 28th, 2010, at 5:00 pm EST.  There will be FIVE lucky winners!

Celesté

You must be a member of Ravelry to buy patterns from my pattern store, which is right here.  Each individual design purchase will get your name put in the drawing.  If you are the selected winner, you can choose any pattern for yourself or, if you like, I can send it to the person of your choice as a gift.  Good luck!

Two Things

One…

 

(another Mrrrphmrrf Cowl for my Etsy shop)

And two…

 

(this is the project I promised pictures of a few weeks back, but we just photographed it this morning.)

As for the new design, almost finished.  With the Rocky Horror Picture Show (which was this past Saturday), time just was not as abundant as I would have liked.  I hope to finish this one by the weekend.

Gaia

Worked up a little something I’m proud of (and love to wear), so say hello to Gaia

Pattern available through Ravelry at above link.

Zombie-Vampire-A-Go-Go

I kind of feel like both right now.  I can’t sleep at night and I’ve been moaning like the undead for the past few days.  Hello, Strep Throat, I can’t say it’s nice to see you again, but here you are!

It’s not getting me down though!  My sock club started getting their February installments on Monday and seem pretty darn happy with this month’s theme (ahem, which is Zombies vs. Vampires, so ironic in many ways).  The Savannah Market Bazaar (see previous post) is less than two weeks away and the excitement is killing me.  My mantra lately has been “Please don’t be cold, please don’t be cold, please don’t be cold, please don’t be cold…” 

I’ve got so much roving for this market, if it does turn out to be cold, I may just make a cocoon out it all or maybe a furry igloo.

Plan on stopping by?  Please do!  Here’s a list of the inventory I’ll have with me (I’ll update if there are any changes):

  • Streetwalker Sock yarns (superwash merino, cashmere, nylon)
  • Uber Sock yarns (superwash wool, nylon)
  • Smooshy yarns (alpaca)
  • Assorted wool rovings (in many natural, undyed colors)
  • Merino rovings
  • Mohair rovings (solid whites and blacks)
  • Yak down (undyed, dark brown)
  • Bamboo roving
  • Soybean (aka Soysilk) roving
  • Hemp roving (this sells out fast, so if you want it, you had better come early)
  • Superwash wool
  • Alpaca roving

See you there!

Lichen Hat

Here is the Lichen Hat for my SIL.  I actually completed it before she arrived (funny, because I usually don’t finish gifts until several months after they’ve departed, this is a strange feeling).  As before, it’s the LichenHat because the yarn is Knit Picks’ Telemark in Lichen.  I had two strays and my SIL looks better in yellow/mustard colors than myself.

Currently, I’m on something.  No, not drugs.  I’m designing something big.  But it’s uber secret, I’m sorry, I just don’t want to spoil anything.  I promise I big, grand photo shoot in the end…  And a pattern.  SQUEE!

Bayberry Hat

What a relief it is to have finished a knitting project, and even more so that I was able to knit from my new book afterall.  I found some stray skeins hiding out in some boxes and after some quick calculations and a few yarn searches, I concluded that there was ample yardage to make this hat.

The hat turned out a little larger than I had anticipated, but the Telemark is sport weight whereas the recommended yarn is closer to fingering weight.  Eh, whatever.  I’ll live.  Here are a few more details:

Pattern:  Uh, well, I’m still working on the translation.  But it came from the Japanese book Simple Knit Wardrobe (I’ve also seen it deciphered as Easy Knit Wardrobe).  For now, it’s the Bayberry Hat.

Yarn:  Knit Picks’ Telemark in Bayberry, two skeins.

Needles/Hooks:  (2) US 3 16″ circular needles and 3.5 mm crochet hook.

There were two more skeins of the Telemark in Lichen, which are currently being transformed into an additional hat for my SIL.  This hat is so quick, I see a last-minute gift tradition brewing already.  Imagine a baby version…  AW!  Sigh.  A friend is pregnant (and a cousin, but we already know that one is a boy) and will, hopefully, be spying that X or Y chromosome soon.

 

I’m routing for a XX just so I can make another hat.